Episode 44: Meet Vincent Lartizien- Entrepreneur with Values, Adventurer, and Renowned Big Wave Surfer

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn
Share on print
Print
Share on pinterest
Pinterest

Listen to the Episode Here

Show Notes

We were always taught in school that our physical body is made up of 70% water. But what does it mean for us? The practical value found in this piece of information lies in how well we connect with nature, including the vast ocean. Surfing is more than a sport. It is a spiritual activity that knots our connection with nature. 

Vincent Lartizien has learned this fact, not with his mind but with his heart. As he was introduced to windsurfing and surfing and through the travels he’s embarked into, he learned that humans are meant to connect with the environment they live in. For decades of professional surfing, he saw how his love was gradually changing into business without values. This became his mission today as an entrepreneur- to bring back the dwindling values in the industry. He created the Nunti Sunya brand along with this idea.

They say this month is the month of love. So today, we get to hear Vincent’s story of how he fell in love and pursued that love, both for surfing and in business. He shares with us his journey with some of the lives he’s lived and how he came out victorious. Tune in and learn how to overcome challenges both in your entrepreneurial journey and in life. Vincent also enlightens us with so much wisdom on the spiritual side of surfing and how finding the energy can help us discover greater realities in our life. Vincent stresses the importance of values and sticking to them. Values are everything that a human is. Without it, how are we different? 

Episode Highlights:

04:19 Living Lives
08:44 The Roaf to Professional Wind Surfing
14:30 Big Wave Surfing Adventures
21:57 Guided The Spirit of the Sea
25:33 Find First The Energy and Discover Larger Reality
30:45 Gain Access to the Universal Rules
34:33 Bringing Back the Value in Biz
46:25 Entrepreneurial Challenges and Solutions

This week, I had the privilege of having a chat with one of the pioneers of big wave surfing: he’s French and his name is Vincent Lartizien.  Vincent started his career as a professional windsurfer. He traveled to Maui in the ’80s to follow his dream and ended up living there for the next 20 years.  It turned out big wave surfing was something he loved doing, and during the time he spent in Hawaii, he learned and mastered the art of tow-in surfing just after it got invented by Laird Hamilton. He was, in fact, the first non-Hawaiian to be allowed to surf Jaws and spent the next 30 years pulling off incredible exploits in dangerous situations in Hawaii and the rest of the world.  

“Nature is a place of freedom where anything that will be taught to you will help you to work your life with deep values.”

Our conversation covers these early years and beyond, but turns into a more spiritual conversation about the flow of energy in the ocean, and how Vincent’s spiritual connection with the ocean has helped him see life differently.  In fact, about 6 years ago, Vincent, against all odds decided to create a hemp t-shirt manufacturing business. Six years later he is a successful soulpreneur with vertically integrated hemp manufacturing facility near Hossegor. It’s from the shores of the Atlantic that practices what he learned from the ocean to succeed in business.  Vincent’s path is atypical but is also fascinating.

Next episode I’ll be chatting with a multipotentialite globetrotter living in Byron Bay.  

 

 

I hope you enjoy this episode.

Take care, have fun, and enjoy the waves.

 

Ciao,

Imi

Connect with Vincent:

Resources Links:

Photos

Related Episodes

Episode 30: Meet Alexandra Lia, founder of SoulSurfer and Seatizens

This week I got to sit down for a chat with Alexandra Lia. I must admit this talk was an incredible cosmic journey through the mind, the body and the soul. You could say Alexandra is a half German half Greek goddess: she is a creative, a filmmaker and a therapist who runs a platform called Soul Surfer, a place for people to find wellness through meditation, workshops and coaching via the healing properties of water.

Read More »

Episode 22: Meet Tom Wegener, PhD, Master Shaper and Surfing Legend

It was the middle of the afternoon in Queensland when I got hold of Tom. In his pink t-shirt, trimmed grey beard, his contagious smile and the sunshine pouring through the window, Tom was an incarnation of the Noosa vibes!
For the few unfamiliar among us, Tom Wegener is a surfer, filmmaker, actor, author, master shaper and an academic. In fact, he has collected so much wisdom on surfing and shaping over the years, he was recently awarded with a PhD on the Sustainability of the Surfboard Industry.

Read More »

Quotes:

“We did the mistake that we could do and we learn.”

“Every time I have seen a sign that comes in front of me, I know I'm connected, there is a special connection and I feel good.”

“Each wave is alive; each wave has a spirit.”

“It's a game we play with the wave and we want the spirit of the wave to guide us, to show us… If you let yourself be guided by the spirit of the wave, you cannot make a mistake.”

“That's what surfing is about- it's not a sport, it's more of a spiritual activity.”

“Matter is created by energy and not the contrary. So all the material that we have, or the matter that we experience with our senses is only a creation of something larger, deeper.”

"when you let go the rope, it's not your mindset is going to tell you where you gotta go right, left, the wave is going to guide you. And if you let yourself be guided by the spirit of the wave, you cannot make mistakes."

“You have to be very balanced. You have to have one foot in the old world that is getting the rules… and one foot in the new world that nobody knows where it's going to be.”

“If we let go of our values, we lose everything.”

“I have to swallow my frustration and to understand that there is a timing for everything.”

SHARE THE LOVE: SUPPORT THE OCEANRIDERS PODCAST

The Oceanriders Podcast is a passion project and, if you like it, you can support it in a number of ways:

Number 1: Share your love for this podcast on iTunes by giving it a few stars, or a review. Better still, subscribe. Anything in this direction increases my ranking and lets more people hear about my fascinating guests and how they are busting the surfing stereotype

Number 2: Comment, and join the conversation on social media. You will find links to my social media accounts on theoceanriderspodcast.com 

Alternatively, you can connect with me on:

Number 3: Join me for an episode or sponsor my podcast! Just send an email to hello@theoceanriderspodcast.com  with a quick bio and I’ll take care of the rest.

Transcriptions:

Imi Barneaud: “Hi Everybody and welcome to the Oceanriders Podcast. Conversations with creatives, entrepreneurs, thinkers and dreamers who also happen to be surfers. My name is Imi and I am your host. Thank you for checking in every 2 weeks and for being more and more every day to listen to the podcast. I really hope you enjoy it. If you do, don’t hesitate to share your feedback (actually if you don’t too for that matter). You can send me an email on hello@theocenariderspodcast.com or connect with me on social media. I’d love to hear from you and see how I can make this podcast better every episode.

If you enjoy this podcast, please support it. You can start by subscribing to it. Hit the subscribe button on Apple podcasts, Spotify, Deezer and your other favorite apps. You can also tell your family, friends and surf buddies about the podcast and even come and join me for a chat and make one yourself! The whole point of this podcast is to share the weird and windy paths of surfers from all walks of life. So if you’re interested, just DM me on social media or send an email to hello@theoceanriderspodcast.com Last but not least, you can help me pay for my awesome podcast editor Leng, and the hosting fees by purchasing some of my super merch. In fact, as I speak, I’m wearing the women’s organic sweatshirt which is so comfortable and stylish, I even wear it to official dos ! There are also some super organic t-shirts, organic wall art and some lovely greetings cards that you can pick-up online. Everything is limited edition and made to order, so skip over to theoceanridersshop.com. If you are a business and would like to advertise, just send me an email and we can see what we can arrange… In any case I’d love to hear from you.

Anyway, enough of the self promotion, and now for my guest… This week, I had the privilege of having a chat with one of pioneers of big wave surfing: he’s French and his name is Vincent Lartizien. Vincent started his career as a professional windsurfer. He traveled to Maui in the 80’s to follow his dream and ended up living there for the next 20 years. It turned out big wave surfing was something he loved doing, and during the time he spent in Hawaii, he learned and mastered the art of tow-in surfing just after it got invented by Laird Hamilton. He was, in fact, the first non hawaiian to be allowed to surf Jaws and spent the next 30 years pulling off incredible exploits in dangerous situations in Hawaii and the rest of the world.

Our conversation covers these early years and beyond, but turns into a more spiritual conversation about the flow of energy in the ocean, and how Vincent’s spiritual connection with the ocean has helped him see life differently. In fact, about 6 years ago, Vincent, against all odds decided to create a hemp t-shirt manufacturing business. 6 years later he is a successful soulpreneur with vertically integrated hemp manufacturing facility near Hossegor. It’s from the shores of the Atlantic that practices what he learned from the ocean to succeed in business. Vincent’s path is atypical but is also fascinating, so without further ado, please welcome Vincent Lartizien.

Hello Vincent, and welcome to The Oceanriders Podcast. How are you today?

Vincent Lartizien: And how are you?

Imi Barneaud: Fine, I’m fine. I’m really, really stoked to do this interview for the second time, and thank you very much for making this time to share your story. So do you think, to start with, you could introduce yourself to the listeners.

Vincent Lartizien: Okay. So my name is Vincent. I’ve been adding a few different things in my life. The first one was in Hawaii for 20 years, being a professional windsurfer first and then a professional software, and then other lives that, maybe it’s not the topic today.

Imi Barneaud: Well, we’ll see what we can actually fit in into this conversation, but I’m sure we will be able to talk about all your lives or some of them. Okay, so where abouts did you grow up?

Vincent Lartizien: So I grew up in the French Riviera by St Tropez because my dad was a surgeon there, and that’s where I spent my life from 0 to 17 until I left for Hawaii. So I was raised on the flat seat.

Imi Barneaud: And who introduced you to wind surfing and the ocean in the first place?

Vincent Lartizien: I lived by the ocean, so I was introduced right away to the ocean and we used to play, no matter what, we used to dive a lot and play with the birds, the same boat at the time. And in the 70’s, I don’t know exactly when I saw the first wind surfer, it was a German guy who brought it from, I don’t know where. And then we saw that guy coming in with this wind surfboard, and it was like, what is that? And I was 11 at the time, and we went to the guy, and I said: “I want to try, I want to try.” And the guy made me try, and after the second try, I just felt the wind and I started to glide, and I’m seeing a switch inside of my stomach. And from that time, that was it.

Imi Barneaud: That’s amazing because you did a trade with your dad about passing your exams, your final exams, and then going off to Hawaii. How did that work out?

Vincent Lartizien: That was a few years after I was hooked on windsurfing, and I saw some picture of Robbie Naish jumping on the waves and I say: “I just want to go there.” That was the other switch I had inside of me, it was a really physical stomach switch. I couldn’t explain it better, but something switched inside my stomach. The first time I climbed on a windsurf board, and the second time was when I saw in Wind magazine that I opened and I saw Hawaiian guys jumping, and I knew I had to go there. I was 16, and I turned to my dad and I say: “I just want to go there.” And he say: Well, when you get your baccalaureate, we will pay your ticket.” I was really bad in school so I never got my baccalaureate and I had to go on my own.

Imi Barneaud: So did you save up, or did you have sponsors by then that helped you pay for the ticket?

Vincent Lartizien: No, no, no, it was in 82 and at that time they were no sponsor on windsurfing so I had to make my own money. So I made some money and I skipped school. My dad’s think that I was still in school and I escaped schooling, I just flew to Hawaii.

Imi Barneaud: How did you actually fit into the environment in Hawaii? How did you meet the first friends and actually get to know the locals?

Vincent Lartizien: I was by myself and all windsurfing at the beginning was opening in Diamond Head and [inaudible], but when I got there in 82, it was the beginning of Ho‘okipa, so [inaudible] switched to Maui. And when I went to Hawaii, I went to Robbie’s store and I asked Robbie’s mom, where are the guys? I want to see them, and blah blah blah, like a French kid, and she says: “He’s not here anymore. You have to go to Maui.” So I got a ticket, I flew to Maui, and I go to Maui, and I work to the beach, and I met some guy and I say: “I’m French, I just arrived.” And at that time, it was so friendly, that the guy told me: “Okay, come to my house.” And from then on, I was just introduced slowly basically to the crew at Ho‘okipa. I went straight to Ho‘okipa, and passed the other beach where you usually go when you stop. And I got introduced to, and friend with all the best guys from there, I know [inaudible], all the big wind surfer guy, and I just made my little place there, then I got married and stuff.

Imi Barneaud: That’s so cool. So was that when you started to become a professional windsurfer?

Vincent Lartizien: The first year, I had my own money and I stayed for one year, always my own money. Then I went back to France, and just before I went, there was a contest, one of the big wind surfing contests where all French people came, all the European professionals came, and the press was there and nobody knew me, but I ended up the best French man at the contest. So from that day, everybody stopped talking about me because I was the French guy nobody knew, and I was good at windsurfing, and I was introduced to other Hawaiians. And from that time, my dad helped me. I went back to France and he gave me some money to go back again, and he helped me for one or two more years, and then the sponsor got it.

Imi Barneaud: They caught up, they rolled in. That’s really cool. And I guess windsurfing and surfing, obviously have something in common, but how did you actually catch the surfing bug coming from the Mediterranean?

Vincent Lartizien: On the not windy days, we had nothing else to do, and the waves, it was my passion there. I just started to love the waves more and more, and from windsurfing, I moved to surfing. When there was no wind, we’d surf all day long. And when there was no wave and no wind, we went fishing to catch our fish because we had no money, we had to eat. So that’s all we did, we windsurfed, surfed, and fished.

Imi Barneaud: So cool. Could you tell us the story when you surfed Jaws with Michel Larronde for the first time?

Vincent Lartizien: Yeah, so when Laird started to do the tow-in thing, we were out there because Laird was a windsurfer, lived on Maui, and Michel had the restaurant La Vie en Rose, so everybody was eating in his restaurant, so we were all just a big family there. And my wife, and Laird’s wife were best friends, every two days I was at his place eating there. So I saw when he first did those stuff, Gerry Lopez was there living on Maui, and he was telling us there is a wave in the sugarcane that nobody knows, in the pineapple field that nobody knows, and you cannot catch the wave paddleing. So he told Laird, and Laird started to go with the Zodiac, then they went with the jet ski, and we were watching from the cliff because Michel lives right above. And when we saw that for the first time, I told Michel: “Man, we gotta go. We gotta do that. That’s too fun.” And so I called my sponsor in France, he bought us a jet ski, and we were the first one to go behind Laird’s crew. The first day was a big adventure because we made the mistake to go like that, like for beginners. So we went with the ski, we arrived there, Laird’s crew was there, and they were already kind of shocked that it was us, it was the French guy that came right behind us, and it was a big swell, and we made a mistake. And Michel at a big swell, one of the biggest one they ever saw there at that time. And so everybody freaked, we couldn’t get him back into the white water, so the old station stop from that, and Laird say’s: “Okay, you guys get to come to the house tomorrow, we’ll talk.” And so we went, we were already stoked because we — for the first time even Michel wiped out. And the next day we went to Laird’s house and we knew all the guys, we knew them very well, and none of them wanted to look at us. And it was this big Hawaiian guy, BD was the kind of their buddy go out somehow, and it’s called us big time like they do in Hawaii, they didn’t punch us or anything, but big time is, they told us: “What you guys know, you did the biggest mistakes, and now you’re going to have to go to [inaudible]. (Which is a beach, lower beach down the coast.) So you’re going to go there for two years, and when we decide that you’ll be ready for Jaws, we’ll call you.” So we did that. We went to [inaudible] and we did our classes (faire ses classes in French), you going to do a class, to get approved–

Imi Barneaud: You earn your place kind of thing.

Vincent Lartizien: Exactly. So we did it, we did every time there was a big swell, we did all the mistakes that we could do, and we learned from them. And on the second year, one day, there was a big swell, and the morning Laird called us and he said: “Okay guys, come up.” And so that was it, we’re a part of the game.

Imi Barneaud: That was amazing. And is that where you also caught the big wave surfing bug like that because you are a renowned big wave surfer around the world. Could you tell us a bit more about your experience with big wave surfing?

Vincent Lartizien: It started with wind surfing. I always liked big waves, and wind surfing at Ho‘okipa to get your place on the lineup. Even windsurfing, you have to go big waves. And not very few guys went, even some of the best guys didn’t like the big waves. They are in smaller waves, in medium sized waves, but when it was really big, nobody was there. But me, somehow I liked it, I don’t know why, I felt good about it. So I was at every big session, I was there. So already, I earned my place with windsurfing. And from going to Jaws, and being the first one to go at Jaws, then again, I earned my place. And then when we came to Europe, and I saw the potential in Europe and nobody knew about that sport, the tow-in, and we brought the first jet ski, then we formed a few of our friends that like big waves, and we went to discover all the European waves. So we were the first one everywhere. So I guess naturally, I gain my reputation there.

Imi Barneaud: What’s the equipment for big wave surfing? Could you describe what your surfboard looks like?

Vincent Lartizien: At the beginning, they were kind of like medium-size big wave surfing boards, but then like 7′ 4”, something like that. And that was at the beginning, the real beginning. Then slowly by slowly, we went shorter, and shorter, and shorter. And at the end, Laird told us that the big wave boards should be our size. I’m 6 foot, so I should use a six foot. And we got narrower and narrower, and heavier and heavier. So we had a board that way, or like maybe 5’10”, 5’8″, but that way, that’s 20 kilos. The speed that you got on large waves, you’ve got it all there, light board, you will fly away. So the heavier the board, the better it was. And also we use straps, and windsurfing we knew about being straped, so it was easy for us to use straps, and we use front straps and back straps too. So that was the equipment back then.

Imi Barneaud: All right. So what do you have to fill the surfboard with to make it heavy? Do you put lead in it or something like that?

Vincent Lartizien: We used to put lead after we put sand. But at the beginning, we put lead. So we built a regular, very small surfboard, and we put lead, it was very special at the beginning, but you could order any speed. And we had very small fins, because the faster you get the less [inaudible]. It was like being on a snowboard, the way you move, the way you approached the wave, but that was 20 years ago. Things are changing.

Imi Barneaud: Yeah. In terms of safety and things like that, what kind of a life jacket did you have at the time? Did you wear one?

Vincent Lartizien: No, we surfed in shorts.

Imi Barneaud: Really.

Vincent Lartizien: Yeah. I have a picture at Jaws in 20 foot waves on shots, the safety was the pilot or ourself. We had to swim back up, and the pilot to get us. And only 10 years after we started, we started to think about life jackets, and we wear life jackets like 10 years after we started.

Imi Barneaud: Wow. So that was definitely taking your life in your hands every day.

Vincent Lartizien: Yeah. But we did a lot of diving. I used to dive at 30 meters depth and catch fish, and hold my breaths, and come back up, so I always used to go down. So far as there was the best training, now you know they go, they work with big rocks under water and stuff. But for us, we have to eat so we had to catch our fish, and so diving was almost, we had to go dive, but that was our best training, knowing it, so we did the best we could do. So we dive before we surf there, so I knew the bottom, I knew the rocks, I knew everything because we always go there to catch fish.

Imi Barneaud: That’s terrific. And you were the first person to surf the wave Belharra in 2002, do you think you could tell us what happened that 22nd of November, 2002.

Vincent Lartizien: Oh, yeah, that was a big day. First, when we went there, our friend didn’t know too much about the wave, so nobody knew about the wave, and nobody had surfed it before. So we went to see it one day, and it was far away at sea so we couldn’t tell if it was big, small, we didn’t know anything. So we went with a bunch of friends. We were like three or four jet skis. And I remember Michel and I were coming back from Hawaii, and I was feeling really good that day. We got there and it was scary looking because it was windy and huge, like 25, 30 foot. And all our friends say: “Okay, okay, we’ve seen the wave, now let’s go back.” And I was like: “What? No, we came here to surf, come on.” So Michel told me: “What? You want to go?” And I said: “Yeah, I’m good. I want to go.” So he stopped, tow-in me to the wave, so I didn’t let go of the rope because when you’re tow-in, when you let go the rope, you’re on your own. As long as you have the rope and you’re okay. So for the first wave to the bar, I wanted to see all the way from where to place myself, [inaudible]. And on the third one I felt good. So I let go the rope and I remember it was heavy wave, and when I got to the end of the wave, my friend where there with the jet-ski and they were looking at me with big eyes like this: “Okay, okay you got one, now we go back, we go back.”

Imi Barneaud: They were still terrified.

Vincent Lartizien: “No, it’s okay, now we got one, we got to get some more.” So I caught a few more and the wind died, and so the place started to come down and the wave looked more easy, and then they started to get the vibe, and slowly by slowly they started, and that was it, decision was on. Then the helicopter came because companies sent it, and they did a bunch of pictures, but that was like one hour after, and then they told our story. They saw the picture to all the press, Germany, everywhere was the wave–

Imi Barneaud: But they didn’t mention the surfer.

Vincent Lartizien: Our story, there was no picture of me at all because I had done it at the beginning. So I was frustrated, I was pissed, some guy came and took a picture of us and sold our story. We took the risk, we put the money, we also have research, but they sold it.

Imi Barneaud: So for the listeners just to say where Belharra is, it’s off the Northern Basque countryside, isn’t it?

Vincent Lartizien: Yeah, it’s on the Spain border, on the Spanish border, and it’s outside of St Jean de Luz, which is the very typical Basque — with a lot of fishermen. And the place Belharra is a big rock, like three kilometers off the coast. There is a rock that comes up, and Belharra means ‘the green grass’ because when you’re on a fishing boat, you see the big green place, because the seaweed on the rocks, they make it to green, and it’s a very good place to fish because it’s really deep around. And when you go there, the fish are there so the fisherman knows the place very well, and they know it for that, and they know it because they lost a lot of friends there, because the wave, sometimes you don’t see it, and all of a sudden it breaks. And for them, it’s a very dangerous place that they fear. And when they saw that, when we surfed there for the first time, they were out there, our board, because they are always there, and they saw us and they say: “Well, where are you going?” And saying: “Why are you going to the wave?” And they told us the name Belharra, we didn’t know, and they say: “You’re going to Belharra, you’re crazy.” And when we came back from that day, and we had the session, they were so pleased, they invited us to the bar and we drank with them. And it was a very special moment, from meeting the fisherman, and the fishermen are so happy because somewhere we eased some scene from them. The place where they lost friends, we went to play there. And the wave is not scary anymore, it was a playground that made a big switch with them, with the old fisherman community. That was important for us.

Imi Barneaud: And there was something very special about that day because I recall you looked at your watch and it was 11:11 in the morning, and all the planets aligned that day on the 22nd, two, two, one, one, one, one, one, one, all the numbers aligned.

Vincent Lartizien: Yeah. I have a special approach with the ocean, and the spirit of the ocean, and life, all together, and I study the energy a lot, and I did three years of really learning about how to play with energy, how people and stuff, how to work with the spirit. And I know that every time I have some middle sign that comes in front of me where I know I’m connected, there’s a special connection, and I feel good in Hawaii. They say that the other world that’s called Lokihi, which means that your physical ability, your mental ability and your spiritual connection, are all together. You have the three together. You are in the Lokihi state. And that day, I was feeling good physically, I had a good mindset. And just before I went in the water, I took my phone to turn it off, and it was 11:11. And for me that was, the little connection I needed to know that the spirit where watching me, and each wave is alive. Each place has a spirit, and every time we go to a new place, we connect to that spirit. We ask permission, we ask the authorization to play, and we come here to play. We don’t come here for no other reason. So we want to come back. We don’t want to die or whatever else. So it’s a game we play with the wave, and we want the spirit of the place, of the waves to guide us, to show us, because when you let go the rope, it’s not your mindset is going to tell you where you gotta go right, left, the wave is going to guide you. And if you let yourself be guided by the spirit of the wave, you cannot make mistakes. That’s where I felt really good and I could do that, that day where it was a scary day and very big waves and stuff like that. So for me, the really important part of the big wave surfing and my approach of the ocean is that special connection that I learned in Hawaii because the Hawaiian were this way,, they asked the authorization before they go into water each day, before they pick up the –, before the pickup fruits, they asked notarization to the land, to the ocean, to the spirits. And that connection makes you have a different approach and a different understanding of the element, and the wave and stuff. And for me, that’s what surfing is about. That’s our self was brought in the first place. For me, it’s not a sport, it’s more like a spiritual activity, spiritual connection, helps you stay connected to the planet, to the fossils, and you are playing with them. That’s all you do, just a game, and in that game, the spirits teach you, they teach you so much, you don’t realize it, but you realize it after that the lesson that has been given to you is so precious that you can apply to all of your life and anything you do in your life. If it goes with the same value, and the same respect, and connection will make no mistake, and you have no fear because it’s just a game and you are guided, but you gotta entertain that connection, and feed that connection. So that’s my approach.

“We made mistakes that we could from, and we learned.”

“Every time I have some sign that comes in front of me, I know I'm connected, there is a special connection and I feel good.”

“Each wave is alive; each wave has a spirit.”

"I saw the surfing industry start from zero and become the large company that they are right now, and I saw slowly by slowly through the years, they lost their values. They lost their spirit. They lost the essence of what surfing was."

“It's a game we play with the wave and we want the spirit of the wave to guide us, to show us… If you let yourself be guided by the spirit of the wave, you cannot make a mistake.”

“That's what surfing is about- it's not a sport, it's more of spiritual activity.”

Imi Barneaud: And did you work with a Kahuna while you were in Hawaii then, did you get taught all these spiritual practices as you were there?

Vincent Lartizien: Not directly. I always loved Kahuna and the Hawaiian mystique site, and the connection to nature. Once I discovered what it was, because at the beginning I didn’t understand what they were doing, I saw that they were praying, but they are no praying at all, they were just connecting to the element, it was not a prayer. So when I realized that I wanted to know more about it, I studied, I read a lot of books, I studied some texts, some ancient mystic texts, and I talked a lot with some friends who were connected with the Kahuna. And then one day I got really sick from a fish poisoning. I called my dad, he was a surgeon and he told me: “Okay, call my friend in Paris, his the specialist for that.” And I called him and he say: “Oh, no, now it’s too late, it’s in your nervous system, you will have it for life. So we cannot do anything. There is nothing medicine can do.” So I went to the Kahuna’s, and they pick up a few grass in my garden, and some stone on the volcano slopes, and they healed me with the stone, one week I was healed. And so for me, it was a big shock to know that some dressed like me in t-shirt and shorts, with flower all over their hair, could know much better than my dad that did 20 years of studies. That was a shock. But that was a shock that showed me that you can gain the knowledge without going to school. And that was really bottom because that freed me a lot, I could learn whatever I wanted, you don’t have to go to school. So slowly by slowly I was introduced to all of that understanding of life, and learning about the Kahunas, and after learning about different ancient tribes, the way they view life, the way they interact with the planet for me was so rich, and there are so much profound teaching. Just learning what those guys did than going to any school that I knew.

“You can gain the knowledge without going to school. And that really freed me. I could learn whatever I wanted.”

Imi Barneaud: That’s really amazing. So basically the mind and the matter is like, there is no mind, there is no matter, it’s just energy. Is that the kind of concept?

Vincent Lartizien: Yeah, it goes beyond that even, but it’s to realize that matter is created by energy and not the contrary. So all the matter that we have or the matter that we experience with our senses, it’s only a creation of something, larger, deeper. So if you are interested in it, then for sure you’re going to want to go to the origin of that matter, just the creation or what’s above that, and above that you will find first the energy, and then you can learn how to play with the energy to work with it and what are they, what do they represent? Where do they come from? But then if you blow even beyond that, then you discover even larger reality where it’s beyond energy where your self is not physical, is not made of matter or energy, it’s your consciousness, it’s something much larger. So it just opens your eyes about what life is, what we see, the matter we experience on earth, and with our physical body is just one little side of reality. And the larger side of reality, it goes so far, and it gives you so much power, and so much freedom, and autonomy that it’s a path that everyone should take. Because if not, you really deepen, and you will be slave to the matter, and it’s only a little time that you would spend in the matter in this physical body. So this is not you, you are much bigger, much larger, much more than you think you are. You are not your body, this is just a sweatshirt you put on, your soul decided to do some experience to the matter. You put this body right now, but will drag that body really soon, and would get back to another state of yourself. So what is that state of yourself? Where does it live? What is it? These are the questions I was asking myself all the time, and I have been studying years, and years, and years to find answers to these questions. And that past is the most beautiful one you can work on, and it’s infinite. I need a way to bring you to some realization about yourself, and life that will make you transform you for you. I have no idea of the transformation that you go through, but it’s beautiful.

“Matter is created by energy and not the contrary. So all the material that we have, or the matter that we experience with our senses is only a creation of something larger, deeper.”

Imi Barneaud: And do you feel that the ocean and waves actually facilitate that feeling, and you are saying about it’s higher than the energy, and the matter, and everything. Do you think that the water actually holds something more, I don’t know, magical or spiritual, and everybody else imagines.

Vincent Lartizien: I think the old planet does, not only the ocean, but the trees, the stones, the plants, the planet by itself, the air, the wind, everything is something behind. And the thing is that, as long as you follow the human rules, you are not yourself because those are created by some people just for you to remain in a state of kind of slavery. The only place where there are no human rules is nature. And within nature, you have access to universal rules. And those, the universal rules are much more valuable, there is much more truth. You would feel so much better by following the universal rules that you are by following human rules. Human rules, we change our country, that shows that they are not union, download for all human, universal rules, they offer everyone. So nature is a place of freedom where anything that will be taught to you, it will be true anyway, help you to work your life with values, with deep values, understanding your place, your relation to others, and to nature by itself. And that thing was the ocean, it’s an element that is very comfortable because you are made of water. 70% of you, you are a bag of water much more than a bag of flesh. You are water, if you are some seed, it’s water. And when you are a kid, it’s 90%. So putting your water in water, it’s just the saying speaks with the ocean, and so you gain your knowledge in the ocean naturally. The ocean speaks to you, a vibratory speaking. It’s not something you’d be conscious of, but it will do its job. And any emotion that you will put in water will be sent back to you, it would be sent back to you times 10. And the Japanese professor Emoto showed that picture of the crystal of water, and he saw that whatever we react to your words, to your energy he said: “We were taught that lesson the other way.” Because if he went into the wave and he was upset, angry, or you wanted everything for your own, you don’t want to share, or whatever, these kinds of bad energy, the ocean will slap you big time. For sure, you will get slapped. But if you have the good approach or the good energy going in the water, and being humble, and bringing your values, and being respectful, and being happy, and being with a lot of appreciation, and deep value, you will have a blast. The ocean will give you so much gift that you will know by the end that you’re playing with the ocean. The same way you will play with your brother or with a friend. And if you play with him and you cheat, it would be unhappy But if you play with him, you are laughing, and you already playing, your brother or your friend will be so happy that the game would be very joyful. So you decide what’s coming to you.

“Nature is a place of freedom where anything that will be taught to you will help you to work your life with deep values.”

Imi Barneaud: Yeah. That’s lovely. That’s so beautiful. And I guess you’re still using this energy and this approach to life in your business and on the list of businessmen. Could you talk to us about your startup that you created about five years ago involving hemp?

Vincent Lartizien: Yeah. I saw the surfing industry start from zero and become the large company that they are right now, and I saw slowly by slowly through the years, they lost their values. They lost their spirit. They lost the essence of what surfing was. They didn’t carry the values anymore. They didn’t speak about what’s happening in the water. The product they sell, they didn’t represent that. So I wanted to do something about it. I wanted to create a product that was respectful of our sport, of our values. And I want to do a T-Shirt because they are, like our second skin. So I went to hemp because I was introduced to [inaudible] in Hawaii, everybody was talking about it a lot. So I decided to start from there to create a brand of t-shirt in a hemp with hemp that we grew ourselves, that we transformed ourselves, and that carry our values, and that we’ll put on the market a product that we’d be proud to say: “The values that we learn in the ocean, and this is our product that we are proud and we sell it to you because we know that you would feel good in it, and blah, blah, blah.” So the company started like that. And from the t-shirt, we moved to the food industry because hemp is so valuable. And we discover the potential of that plant, which is a magical plant. And by everything that I had learned in the process of learning to work with the spirit that I received, I started to apply it to the business and asking the plant to guide me, and asking the plant to help me to represent it the best way I could. So I was taught to work with the energy somehow, and to build in the invisible world what you want to appear in the matter. So for example, if you want to make a table, you’re going to visualize the table in your head, and you’re going to visualize the tools that you need. And that visual, is going to help you build the table in the matter. So I started to do a lot of visualization and work with the hemp spirit and meditation to create what I wanted to create. A company that would be able to grow, transform, and bring into the pubic everything that this plant could produce. Food, clothing, shelter, medicine, and everything in the way that the plants, respecting the plant, and respecting the people. So I became mostly an ambassador for the plant, and I spent so many hours in meditation with the hemp spirit just to train, to be guided through all the processes that I, our approach is a little bit unique in an industry or business, and in a company like that. For me, it was the only way to do business. I don’t want to do a commercial business. I wanted to find my place on this planet, and what I could do so I could transmit everything that was being given to me.

Imi Barneaud: That’s beautiful. So today, you’ve got a vertically integrated company, so you grow, you transform, and then you distribute all the different products possible for hemp, is that correct?

Vincent Lartizien: Yeah. We are not yet able to do all the products. The textile is a very complex subject because there is a lot of different knowledge that you need to gain back, how to thread, how to weave, how to dye, how to construct and everything. So it involves many different industries that are very, takes a lot of money to bring back together. But right now we are doing all the food industry with the seeds. We are doing a line of textile but it’s not with our fiber yet, and we are doing cosmetics, and we are doing therapeutic, or with the cannabinoid molecules, and we are starting to build the factory to be able to do the construction project. So we are in this process, we are not yet to the point where we can say ‘okay, we can do every project,’ but we are building, we are only three years old, so we moved really fast. And when a company moves fast and grows fast, it’s also very difficult financially to the company, and we had to deal with the financial part, which is very far away from our values.

Imi Barneaud: How did you deal with that?

Vincent Lartizien: It’s a balance. It’s working the Earth’s right now, you have to be very balanced. You have to have one foot in the old world that is getting the rules, that you don’t want to deal with, and one foot in the new world that nobody knows what it’s going to be, or what other rules this new world and stuff. So you’ve got to find the middle point, and the balance, and be straight to your values. So that’s what I’m trying to do. I have some financial partners and they have a different view than me, but they are an energy that we need to build the company. So we work with older energy, and each energy has its rules, and you have to be able to accept the rules even if you don’t really match with them. That’s where we are right now on the planet. We are in between two worlds. We are in a total change of paradigm, and we are in a total change of consciousness. So we are leaving well to enter a new one, and we are in between, and it’s a very difficult place. But it’s a very exciting place because we are building the new world now, and that’s what I believe we are trying to do. Saying, okay, there is a new way towards the earth. There is a new way to make businesses. There is a new way to bring products to the people, and we are going to do it with our values.

"We are in between two worlds. We are in a total change of paradigm, and we are in a total change of consciousness. So we are leaving well to enter a new one, and we are in between, and it's a very difficult place. But it's a very exciting place because we are building the new world now, and that's what I believe we are trying to do."

“If we let go of our values, we lose everything.”

“I have to swallow my frustration and to understand that there is a timing for everything.”

Imi Barneaud: That’s so important as a business owner to have your values and stick to them because that really is your guiding lights to decisions that you’re going to make and where you want to take your products.

Vincent Lartizien: Yeah. I believe that, that’s our mantra. Our values, if we let go of our values, we lose everything. If our values are in our product, then we can sell our product being proud and our product really will shine with values, we vibrate these values. And the vibration of the product would be high, and then the people will notice it, and you don’t have to commercialize, you don’t have to talk about the product and say, Oh, my product is better than this one, or whatever. You just have to be middle and build valuable products, and for sure at the end you will be rewarded. And the product we didn’t make, but it’s a difficult one to explain to your financial path.

Imi Barneaud: What’s really interesting in your process for the hemp oil for example, is that you inform it. Now, could you tell us a bit more about this process?

Vincent Lartizien: Yeah, if energy creates matter, and what we do in our business is to create matter. We take a product which is for [inaudible], so we create a new matter. So if we want to add to this matter anything, we can do it. But through the energies, we can inform the product with the values that we want. And our value is simple, for example, we nourish hemp. Hemp is here to nourish your health. We don’t fight sickness. My dad did, my brother did it, my uncle did it, the old surgeon and doctor. And I did some study to ill people, when you’re ill people, you are against sickness. But I decided to do it differently, to nourish hemp, because if you nourish hemp, then you don’t get sick. So our goal is to use hemp to nourish the people, so we put that information, and now genetically onto all of the products. And you can bring that information into the molecules at the atomic level, with the intention and the energy to control. So we use that, I was taught by some people how to work with those tools and the analogy. So we use what I’ve been taught to inform each of our products. So the vibratory level of the product is high.

If you grow apples, and you love your apple tree, and when you pick apples, you love your apple, they are so good, are so happy, and you are always smiling because you are happy under this tree, the apples will carry these vibrations. And when you sell the apple, the person that will eat it, they will eat that vibration. So they will feel really good because it’s full of love. If you do the same and you are really upset with your tree, and you are really at anger and tired, and you are forced to work and pick up the apple in a field where it’s full of chemicals and stuff, you’re going to feel really bad, and you’re going to be angry, and you’re going to be sad and stuff. The apple is going to carry that energy. And when you’re going to eat it, you’re going to eat that sadness, you’re going to eat that pollution, you’re going to eat all of that. So that’s what we wanted to bring on top of our product even more, so to be sure that we bring the highest vibration level possible to each of our products, so we respect that plant. And we work a lot with the farmer to teach them that, to tell them, if you are happy when you go in your field, all bacteria life of your field is going to react to that happiness, and they’re going to feed the plant, and the plant is going to feel that happiness, and the plant is going to vibrate that happiness. So it’s going to gain more minerals from the soil, and it’s going to get a better taste. And this is not as a carriage, this is mechanical, but it’s the mechanic of the energy. And now, modern science is discovering that. But before when you told that to the people, they think we were all just crazy little hippie guys who smoked too much weed. But now, more and more people are starting to understand, especially when you experience that by eating a fruit from your farmer, local farmer that is a happy face and is smiling, or eating the food from the grocery store that is full of pesticide and vibration, you will feel the difference on your own. So you will know that, and that’s an important thing to know.

Imi Barneaud: Oh, that’s beautiful. It’s a lovely way to end this conversation because everything that we bring with us, and our feelings, and our attitude is just of glows everywhere. So yeah, it’s so important and it’s so nice to think that there are farmers that are informed about this energy, that they’ll go into their field and they’ll feel happy, and they’ll make their products better and everything inevitably. That’s just such a nice way to grow your business, that’s really, really cool. And in terms of challenges actually growing the business from scratch, what was the biggest challenge that you faced? Actually growing Nunti Sunya.

Vincent Lartizien: It’s to make the people understand the level of consciousness that you want to bring business, that takes time. That takes time because for the people to understand where you are, because I am, way even feel that where I am showing my financial partner, the people that I work with so — myself, I have to swallow my frustration, and to understand that there is a timing for everything, and you have to work through step, in Hawaii, I wanted big waves right away, no, you’re going to get slapped, and you’re going to get push back, you got to do your class for two years and stuff. So passions have been a really big challenge, and financial issues have been a really big challenge but it’s starting to ease now, because after three years people would stop to gain more confidence about how crazy I am, starting to be a little bit more easy. And the planet is changing, people are understanding that, and it’s changing really fast. We are understanding more and more how it’s starting out. It’s working, it’s not the way they taught us. So we wake up one by one everywhere, and that is what we are saying about understanding. I think putting consciousness in everything you are doing, we realize now that this is vital, or we are going to kill off self, we’re going to kill the planet, and we’re going to leave a world that damaged our children. So bringing consciousness, and understanding what consciousness is, and discovering on our own by ourself what it is, and what rules we should follow, and who we should listen to and whatever.

Imi Barneaud: It’s an exciting time. And would you have any books to recommend if we wanted to learn more about this paradigm?

Vincent Lartizien: I have so many, best thing I could say is going to the library (bookstore), going to the Esoteric Library, going to a spiritual library and just feel what book is calling you. That will be the one you need at that time, and that will change through time so just trust yourself. See the one you’ve been attracted to, even if it’s only for the color, or well, this one is calling you. Take it and read, there’s something for you there.

Imi Barneaud: Oh, that’s beautiful. That’s a wonderful way actually to conclude this interview Vincent, and thank you ever so much for being my guest today. So I guess if there’s anything you’d like to promote, this is your moment, maybe some websites or social media accounts where we could get ahold of you. Maybe we could order your gorgeous projects.

Vincent Lartizien: I just want to promote hemp.

Imi Barneaud: Okay.

Vincent Lartizien: Just go search hemp cannabis, you will find us.

Imi Barneaud: Okay, that’s perfect. That’s perfect. Well, it’s been a lovely conversation Vincent, and thank you for joining me. I hope maybe to meet up again soon in the near future to do a recap and see what’s going on in your business and then your life. Thank you very much.

Vincent Lartizien: Thanks to you, thank you.

Imi Barneaud: That was a delightful conversation. I hope you enjoyed it too.

If you want to get hold of Vincent’s products, head over to nuntisunya.com, and if you’re in France, you can go to any BioCoop and get some of Vincent’s products. Check out Vincent’s Facebook page at Nunti Sunya, and on Instagram at les_chanvres_de_latlantique.

All the information mentioned in this podcast is available on my website and in the show notes of this episode (just check them out on your podcast app). On theoceanriderspodcast.com you’ll also find some great info and photos of my guest so, please don’t hesitate to have a look. Links to it are in the show notes.

If you enjoy this podcast, please share the love. You can tell your friends, family, fellow surfers in the lineup about this podcast but if you want to do more to support me, you can too. I have created an online merch shop, called the oceanriders shop. It has a collection of t-shirts, sweatshirts, greetings cards and wall art for all types of budgets, so be sure to check them out on theoceanriderssshop.com. Links to it are in the show notes. All profits will go to paying for my awesome podcast editor Leng, and 1% of the sales will be automatically donated to WIRES NSW, a wildlife rescue organisation that is doing its best to rescue the wild animals from the Australian bushfires.

Next episode I’ll be chatting with a multipotentialite globetrotter living in Byron Bay. Until next episode, take care, have fun and enjoy the waves.

Ciao.

SUPPORT THE SHOW

Consider buying some Oceanriders merch'! Profits from the merchandise will be used to pay for equipment, podcast editor and promotion of the podcast on social networks. Find some beautiful art and limited 100% organic apparel. 1% of my sales will be donated to WIRES Australia (Australian wildlife rescue)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Scroll to top